“Social Media Round-Up” is an ‘ICYMI’ compilation of the top hunger-related news articles and other interesting tidbits posted on our social media profiles.

  • Starbucks Finally Starts to Donate All of its Unsold Food. But Donating Isn’t as Easy as It Seems., FORBES.COM
  • Perishable prepared food donations are a bit more challenging for nonprofits to accept and distribute. Thanks to a grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, we’ve hired consultants to help us figure out if and how we should manage these kinds of donations.

  • America Doesn’t Have a Food Problem. It Has a Hunger Problem., VOX.COM
  • “An estimated one in seven Americans faced inadequate or inconsistent access to food at some point in 2014.”

  • The Poor and Middle Class are Fleeing America’s Booming Cities, QZ.COM
  • “The cities riding major economic booms are losing the greatest proportion of their poor and middle class residents. Two of the top three most expensive areas for renters—San Jose, Calif., and Silver Spring, Md.—saw the greatest exodus for those earning $60,000 or less.”

  • California Agriculture Contributes Record Amount of Farm Products to Food Banks, PLANTINGSEEDSBLOG.CDFA.CA.GOV
  • Last year, we acquired about 29.5 million pounds of fresh produce through California Association of Food Banks’ Farm to Family program!

  • Hungry Childhoods Carry Long-Term Impact, MERCURYNEWS.COM
  • “In a month, millions of school-age children will be leaving the security of their schools — and school-provided breakfasts and lunches — for homes that don’t have enough food in them.” ‪‬

  • Million-Dollar Homes: The New Norm in the Bay Area, MERCURYNEWS.COM
  • “In San Francisco and Silicon Valley, there’s about a 50 percent chance that it’s worth $1 million or more.” Yep, that’s our reality.

  • The Poor Pay More For Everyday Purchases – and It’s Getting Worse, a New Study Warns, WASHINGTONPOST.COM
  • “After 20 years, for example, every dollar in the pocket of a poor consumer would be worth just 88 cents compared to what a wealthier consumer would be able to buy with it at the grocery store, given the differences in inflation and in both consumers’ preferences.”

  • Silicon Valley’s Middle Class is Shrinking as Wealthy Prosper, MONEY.CNN.COM
  • “While jobs are more plentiful and pay better in Silicon Valley than in other parts of the state, the higher cost of living still leaves many middle class and lower-income residents in a bind. ‘Even if you are paid more on the job, you are still falling behind at a faster rate than the state and the nation,’ [California Budget & Policy Center Executive Director Chris] Hoene said.”

    *** Read past Social Media Roundups.